Thank you for considering Angel Orthodontics. We offer a variety of treatments designed to treat all of the unique orthodontic conditions that our patients of all ages experience. We believe that every patient deserves the chance to achieve and maintain the smile of their dreams, regardless of his or her age or orthodontic problem.

There are a variety of common problems our patients experience prior to beginning treatment. Learn more about these common issues below and see what Angel Orthodontics can do to improve your smile!

When a person’s teeth or jaws do not fit together properly, orthodontic treatment may be necessary to correct the problem, straighten the teeth and promote ideal function. If left untreated, these orthodontic problems, often referred to as malocclusions (or bad bites), can cause speech difficulty, premature wear of the teeth and protective enamel, and even increase the chance of injury to the teeth and jaw joints.

Excessive protrusion of the upper front teeth – “buck teeth” – is by far the most common orthodontic problem.

Class II patients usually exhibit a convex facial profile with a recessed chin. In most cases, this problem has genetic origin.
The appearance and function of your teeth are impacted by this type of bite. It is characterized by the upper teeth extending too far forward or the lower teeth not extending far enough forward.

Ways to treat it:

Twin Blocks

 

Twin blocks are an orthodontic functional appliance used to help correct jaw alignment normally in children. They reduce the overjet. Often the lower jaw develops too far back, and while the child is growing this can be modified using braces. Custom made twin blocks are produced and positioned in the mouth.In order for the patient to close their mouth when wearing the twin blocks, they must push their bottom jaw forward. This teaches the lower jaw to close in the new position and over time this will permanently correct the overbite. Twin-Blocks should be worn all the time. However, if at first you find your jaw gets tired, simply leave the brace out for a while and rest your mouth. Since Twin-Blocks are jaw aligning braces, if the teeth themselves are crooked a fixed brace to correct your teeth will need to be fitted after the Twin-Block treatment.

 

Herbst Appliance

 

An alternative to a Twin Block is a Herbst appliance. This is made to fit onto the top and bottom teeth. The device is then fitted together with a sliding bar. As the jaw closes the appliance forces the bottom jaw forward thereby training the muscles.

Class III problems are also primarily genetic in origin. An underbite is characterized by the lower jaw extending too far out, causing the lower front teeth to sit in front of the upper front teeth.

The lower jaw may appear to be excessively large, but in many cases the lack of upper jaw development is at fault. Several treatment options are available to correct a Class III problem.

Pseudo Class III, particularly in younger patients, is a function of habit or malaligned teeth rather than hereditary factors. A misaligned bite may cause the lower teeth to bite forward of the upper teeth, giving the appearance of a Class III. Interceptive treatment is imperative to prevent abnormal growth of both the upper and lower jaws.

CROSSBITE
A posterior crossbite will usually result from a narrow upper jaw or abnormally wide lower jaw. In order to close the mouth,

patients move their lower jaw forward or to the side when closing into a stable bite. When closed into this position, the lower teeth are located outside the upper teeth which may cause misaligned jaw growth resulting facial asymmetry.

. A posterior crossbite can involve one side of the jaw, known as a unilateral crossbite, or both sides of the jaw, known as a bilateral crossbite.

Ways to treat it:

Quad Helix Expander

 

Normally the upper teeth sit more towards the cheek than the lower teeth. Although it may appear to involve only one side of the mouth, most crossbites are due to a narrow upper jaw on both sides. The lower jaw tends to sit to one side as people with a crossbite bring their teeth together and this can make it look as if one side is not affected. When we treat a crossbite, for the most part, we expand the upper jaw on both sides.

Patients who suffer from crossbite can be treated using the “Quad Helix Expander”. The appliance is fitted to the back teeth of the upper jaw, under compression which will naturally push outwards, gently expanding the upper jaw. The upper jaw expands to match the width of the lower jaw.

Removble Expansion Appliance

 

 

 

 

Patients who suffer from crossbite often have a classic V shaped arch. A removable appliance is custom made to fit the shape of each patient’s mouth. Slowly, over months, it is expanded using the adjustment in the appliance. Finally, the arch becomes U shaped.

CROWDING

OVERLAPPED OR CROOKED TEETH
Crowding of the teeth is probably the most common orthodontic problem and It is the most common reason for braces. Although many factors contribute to dental crowding, this problem typically stems from a discrepancy between the space in each jaw and the size of the teeth( teeth too big or jaws too small).

Crowding can be the cause or result of other problems, such as impacted teeth, retained teeth or teeth that do not naturally fall out. Crossbite of the front or rear teeth can also cause the teeth to become crowded. Not only is crowding unattractive, but it has also been linked to periodontal problems and dental decay because it is harder to clean overlapping teeth’s surfaces.

Ways to treat it:

Interproximal Reduction

 

Sometimes overcrowding can be solved without removing teeth. Stripping a very thin layer of enamel from a number of teeth can create room. Sometimes this is performed with a drill and sometimes with abrasive paper. The teeth can then be aligned using a Fixed Appliance.

Removal of teeth

 

Rather than remove the teeth which are out of position, all first premolars are removed. A Fixed Appliance is fitted. The teeth are pulled gently into line over several months using elastic bands.

SPACING, GAPS
Spaces between teeth are another common problem associated with the need for orthodontic care. Like crowding, spacing may be related to a tooth-to-jaw size disharmony. Spacing may occur between the front or the back teeth. Tooth size discrepancies, such as smaller teeth or abnormally shaped teeth, or tongue thrust habits can also create abnormal spacing. Spacing problems may be caused by Congenitally missing teeth. Missing teeth can cause drift and overeruption of other teeth.

Missing lateral incisors

 

Sometimes there is not enough bone between teeth to place an implant. ‘Bone space’ can be created by using a brace. The spring between the teeth opens and straightens the teeth, creating room for an Implant to be positioned.

Drift and Overeruption

 

When a tooth is missing, drift and overeruption can take place. Food traps are created and can lead to a build-up of plaque. If these teeth are not kept clean, decay can result and they can be lost and the whole process starts again.

Space Maintainer

 

When a ‘baby tooth’ is lost early in development the adjacent teeth can sometimes fall into the gap that is created (Drift). To prevent this a ‘space maintainer’ will be used to preserve the gap until the permanent tooth is ready to develop.

Impacted teeth

 

Sometimes a Canine tooth can develop in the Palate. This can be moved like any other tooth by using a Fixed Appliance. The appliance is used to correct the position of the other teeth first then it is attached to the Canine. The Canine is gently pulled into position.

INCISOR OVERBITE, Deep bite
Deep bite is excessive vertical overlapping of the incisors where upper front teeth cover the lower front teeth too much.

This is generally found in association with a discrepancy between the length of the upper and lower jaws. It usually results in excessive eruption of the upper or lower incisors, or both sometimes causing the lower front teeth to bite too far up behind the upper front teeth into palate and into the roof of the mouth. Problems often associated with an overbite include “gummy” smile, protruding lips and excessive incisor wear.

OPENBITE
An openbite can occur with the front teeth, known as an anterior openbite or with the back teeth, referred to as a posterior openbite.

An anterior openbite is the lack of vertical overlap of the front teeth and can usually be traced to jaw disharmony or habits such as thumb sucking or the thrusting of the tongue against the front teeth. The patient can stick his or her tongue between upper and lower front teeth when the back teeth are together. Both upper and lower incisors are forced outwards to an extent that the teeth do not touch each other, even when the mouth is closed. The smile is adversely affected and may develop a lisp.

A posterior openbite is a problem in which the back teeth do not meet vertically, which keeps the jaw from functioning properly. Proper chewing is impacted by this type of bite.An early evaluation and intervention is essential in correcting an openbite.

An anterior openbite is the lack of vertical overlap of the front teeth and can usually be traced to jaw disharmony or habits such as thumb sucking. The thumb pushes the upper teeth up and to the front causing an anterior open bite. The patient can then stick his or her tongue between upper and lower front teeth when the back teeth are together. Upper incisors are forced outwards to an extent that the front teeth do not touch , even when the mouth is closed.

An anterior openbite is the lack of vertical overlap of the front teeth and can usually be traced to jaw disharmony or habits such as the thrusting of the tongue against the front teeth. The patient can stick his or her tongue between upper and lower front teeth when the back teeth are together. Both upper and lower incisors are forced outwards to an extent that the teeth do not touch each other, even when the mouth is closed. The smile is adversely affected and may develop a lisp.

Dental Midlines not Matched
The spaces between the two upper front teeth and the two lower front teeth should line up with each other and both should line up with the bridge of the nose. When they do not, the probable cause is drifted teeth or a shifted lower jaw, resulting in an improper bite.

Dental midlines that do not match are evident when the back bite does not fit and match appropriately. This may negatively impact jaw function and proper dental function.

Center Line Shift

 

In some cases the centre of the upper and lower jaw are out of line. A band can be fitted to special points on a fixed appliance. This will correct the alignment over time.

EXCESSIVE GINGIVAL DISPLAY, GUMMY SMILE

This orthodontic problem gives the appearance of excessive exposed gums on the upper arch. There are several treatment options for this problem. It may simply involve lifting the upper front teeth using braces to help reduce the excessive gum display. In more severe cases with a jaw discrepancy, surgery may be necessary to lift the upper jaw to help reduce the excessive exposure of the upper gum tissue.

Anti snoring

Mandibular repositioning splint (MRS) (also known as a mandibular advancement device or MAD). An MRS is designed to push your jaw and tongue forward. This will increase the space at the back of your throat and reduce the narrowing of your airway that is causing your tongue to vibrate, resulting in snoring.

If your snoring is associated with breathing difficulties, such as sleep apnea, it is recommended that a MRS is made specifically for you by an orthodontist using impressions of your teeth and jaw.